Eskimo, Inuit, and Inupiaq: Do these terms mean the same thing?

There seems to be a lot of confusion about what to call the Alaskan Eskimo people. Here are the terms that are often confused and an explanation of the differences. …Eskimo, Inuit, and Inupiaq: Do these terms mean the same thing? » »

Eyak Culture Area

The Eyak Culture Area is the smallest native group in Alaska. Their traditional village on the Copper River highway on the Malaspina Coastal Plain was absorbed into the town of Cordova, Alaska in 1906, when their numbers had dwindled to only about 60 Eyak remaining. …Eyak Culture Area » »

Aleut Culture Area

Aleut Culture Area Map

The Aleut Culture Area includes the Aleutian Islands and the nearby Alaska Peninsula at the Southern edge of Alaska. The term “Aleut” was introduced by Russians and comes originally from the Koryak or Chukchi languages of Siberia. Aleut comes from the Russian word Aleuty. …Aleut Culture Area » »

Athabascan Culture Area

Athabascan Culture Area Map

The Athabascan Culture Area, also known as the “Interior” of Alaska, runs from south of the Brooks Mountain Range down to the Kenai Peninsula. The Athabascans  of Alaska traditionally lived along five Alaskan rivers: the Yukon, the Tanana, the Susitna, the Kuskokwim, and the Copper River. …Athabascan Culture Area » »

Native Village of Cantwell

Native Village of Cantwell, Alaska

The Native Village of Cantwell members are Athabascan Indians. Cantwell (Yidateni Na’) is off the Parks Highway. It is a census-designated place (CDP) in Denali Borough, Alaska, United States. Cantwell is the western terminus of the Denali Highway.
…Native Village of Cantwell » »

Native Village of Elim

Brief Introduction …Native Village of Elim » »